can be found here.

Why? Well, it ought to be clear that the characters inhabit what looks like a Big Society. Everything is run by a member of the community – in fact, Miss Rabbit seems to do most of it, selling ice cream, tickets at the Museum, running the fire station, and so on.

There is only a hint of a productive economy out there, with Daddy Pig’s office doing something that involves ‘load bearing tangents’.

As for the government, it is hard to count Mr Zebra the Postman – particularly as he often helps out, such as when he popped in to build Peppa Pig’s new toy cupboard in return for a tea with six sugars*.  Mr Bull, assisted by a rhino, deals with the roads, but with such enthusiasm that it looks like a hobby – and since he also collects the rubbish, and even carts Christmas trees around, it looks more like his turn at the commune than government 9-5ing.

Doctor Brown Bear operates like a pro-bono medic from before the war, rushing to the bedside of anyone with a tickly cough or spots, and parroting oldfashioned advice like “I’m never ill – I eat an apple a day!”.  The teacher, Madama Gazelle, has been in the same job since she taugh Mummy and Daddy Pig herself.  And she mucks in with the ballet class.   When her school needs more cash, it’s a Jumble Sale, or they put emotional pressure on Daddy Pig to do an enormous sponsored run.

Family ties are also vital.  The older generation is always present – the only babysitting is done by grandparents, who also keep the flame burning for oldstyle skills like building trains and planting tomatoes.

So, yes, Peppa is a beautiful image of a multi-cultural world at peace with itself – although it illustrates with unflinching accuracy the jealousies and competitiveness between children.   But its ruling principles are all conservative.  Perhaps it is what gave Cameron the Big Society idea in the first place?

*It is interesting that Mr Bull and Mr Zebra who are both ‘handy’ have the most working class accents

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15 thoughts on “Questions to which the answer is ‘Tory’, number 1

    1. Yes… am I in a minority? Quickly, what proportion of men in the UK are parents? But what proportion of men who write blogs and comment on them are parents ….

      1. Nah. That would require me to be sufficiently less self-involved so as to be willing to stop reading books and blogs and instead to feed and clothe a living creature for at least 18 years.

        I’ll have a dog, because I like walking them. But that’s about as far as it goes.

      2. A tenner says you’re a father before the decade is out.

        When I was early 20s I used to wander around with Books Etc bags full of books. A law should have been passed against me ever being a Dad. Now it’s my main role in life. Stuff changes, thankfullly …

  1. On the other hand if you want your actual children’s animated class struggle, see Ben and Holly’s Little Kingdom from the same production company.

  2. “Nah. That would require me to be sufficiently less self-involved so as to be willing to stop reading books and blogs and instead to feed and clothe a living creature for at least 18 years.”

    Why? Are the traditions which made this country great so easily forgotten?

    What the hell’s wrong with nannies? Didn’t we conquer an Empire on those so raised?

    It’s actually an amusement reading Keynes’ economic propects for our grandchildren in the light of these changed mores about children and domestic labour. As a man of his class and time he doesn’t seem to mention at all what has actually happened with labour hours in reality over the time he forecasts.

    There’s been a huge and massive reduction in household production hours for both men and women. There’s been a rise in market working hours for women and a fall for men. The overall effect has been just the sort of reduction in total working hours that he predicted. But because he entirely skates over household production (think “servants”) his predictions seem out.

    1. “There’s been a huge and massive reduction in household production hours for both men and women.”

      Not for me there ain’t. I swear that I have changed more nappies and spooned more porrige than 4 men of the previous generation would have. I am seriously resentful.

  3. Well, yes, but your household production hours in growing veggies, feeding the pig (err, possibly not the most appropriate phrase), clearing the gutters, scything the lawn and repairing the motor car have fallen.

    All those time use surveys show that leisure hours have been increasing faster than working market hours have been falling.

    1. Fair point. I’m not being macro, but kinda begging the question that 80 years ago I would have been a professor or somesuch, and only dealing with my kids when it was time to smoke the pipe, pat them on the heads, or chastise them violently.

  4. “and only dealing with my kids when it was time to smoke the pipe, pat them on the heads, or chastise them violently.”

    You mean you have more interaction with them than that?

    Why?

    1. Actually, a lot of it is fun, I reply in a po-faced manner (because I know I complain more than celebrate).

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